Dunedin

Curb appeal

Curb appeal

Front entrance

The front of this house was poorly planned and a mix of overgrown and dying bushes that completely obscured the view outside and inside. The plants were chosen to provide beauty and color while still maintaining a manageable size.

Shade perennial garden

Shade perennial garden

Side of home

Before we began on this part of the garden, the side of the house was grass all the way to the brick wall. We transplanted shrubs from the front of the house, created a contoured, raised bed along the entire length of the side, and planted a variety of perennials to complete the design.

Beautifying a corner

Beautifying a corner

Utilities box

The stone wall was extended to include the corner of the yard where the utility box was located. Large perennials planted in front of the box helped to camouflage it and draw the eye away from it.

Stone walls and perennials

Stone walls and perennials

Back garden

Previously only a series of crepe myrtles planted at intervals in front of the wall, we expanded the available planting area to include a wide variety of perennials and flowering shrubs, bordered by a low, dry stacked, stone wall.

Stone wall and perennials

Stone wall and perennials

Back garden

One end of a long narrow perennial and flowering shrub garden with a stone wall border.

View from the porch

View from the porch

Back yard

The previous view was of a brick wall with a couple of crepe myrtles. Now it is a riot of color and interest.

North Davidson perennial bed

North Davidson perennial bed

Sidewalk garden

This house had no gutters, so the water falling off the roof line kept washing away mulch and soil from around the plant roots. The creek stone solves that problem and does so beautifully.

Kannapolis poolside

Gate entrance

Gate entrance

Riot of color and texture

Near the woods

Near the woods

10 months later

American purple beautyberries and Miscanthus 'Morning Light'

Poolside perennials

Poolside perennials

along the fence

Besided the creeping phlox, vines were planted along the fence so that it too would provide visual interest and add some screening to the driveway.

Hiding the pool pump

Hiding the pool pump

just planted

Hiding the pool pump

Hiding the pool pump

8 months later

Poolside bank

Poolside bank

just planted

Poolside bank

Poolside bank

8 months later

Poolside bank

Poolside bank

8 months later

Taken from the bottom of the bank, you can also see the stone steps planted with mazus.

Huntersville renovation

Huntersville renovation

Huntersville renovation

Before

Contractors often plant bushes as foundation plantings that become too large and difficult to take care of. This homeowner chose to have everything removed in order to install a landscape that would be easier to care for while still providing curb appeal and color.

Huntersville renovation

Huntersville renovation

After

The house is now visible, and because of careful choices, should remain so even after the shrubbery is fully mature.

Huntersville renovation

Huntersville renovation

After

A closer look...

Replanted front foundation bed

Replanted front foundation bed

After

Another perspective. Due to the slope, we added a low retaining wall to keep the end of the bed in place.

Garage and right side

Garage and right side

Before

The bushes flanking the garage door were so large and dense that the lights there were completely hidden and unusable.

Front entrance bed

Front entrance bed

Before

Dead and dying junipers populated the bed leading to the front door.

Front entrance bed

Front entrance bed

Mid-project

All existing plant material was removed and roots cleaned out of the bed. A catch basin and drain was installed in the back corner to help transport water away from the house foundation. The bed was tilled, amended, and raked.

Front entrance bed

Front entrance bed

After

The bed by the front entrance was completely redesigned to provide color, texture, and beauty while maintaining ease of care.

Front entrance bed

Front entrance bed

After

Another perspective.

Mailbox

Mailbox

Redone

Before, the mailbox was simply surrounded by old, weedy, white pea gravel and scalloped brick colored edging. Now there is more interest, a softer look, and a more welcoming introduction to the home.

Indian Trail redesign

View of the home

View of the home

Before

The homeowner had removed all of the previous landscape plants and was then overwhelmed with how to renovate. Weeds then quickly took over the beds.

Foundation beds

Foundation beds

Before

All that is here is weeds and weedy grass.

Bed in front of garage

Bed in front of garage

Before

More weeds

Foundation and garage

Foundation and garage

After

The homeowners chose smaller plants with great space between in order to need less maintenance and a more sparse appearance.

Driveway bed

Driveway bed

Before

Weeds again....

Driveway bed

Driveway bed

After

A grouping of 'Kaliedoscope' abelia and a border of drift roses add color and softening. There is also a group of Pink Muhly grass at the corner of the sidewalk.

Dilworth Dermatology

Renovated strip garden

Renovated strip garden

Parking lot

Raspberry support

Raspberry support

Raspberry support

Before

This raspberry had outgrown and collapsed its previous bamboo support frame. Something sturdier and longer lasting was in order

Rasberry support

Rasberry support

After

We combined ideas from the homeowner with long lasting materials and built this strong and attractive frame for the raspberry with side supports that can be removed for easy access.

Matthews--Drab to Fab

Front foundation

Front foundation

Before

The shrubbery in front of this house had become overgrown and out of hand, so the homeowners had their son pull it all out. This left them with another problem--what to put there?!

Front foundation

Front foundation

After

After finding out what kind of a look the homeowners wanted, we installed a row of Korean boxwoods across the back of the bed as a low growing hedge and red drift roses for color.

Patio planting

Patio planting

Before

Nothing to see looking out the bedroom or kitchen window.

Patio planting

Patio planting

After

A camellia provides color outside the bedroom window, and the loropetalum will eventually grow tall enough to screen the air conditioner.

Patio planting

Patio planting

Before

There is nothing in the bed but solar lighting and pine needles.

Patio planting

Patio planting

After

A combination of low growing camellias and pink drift roses provides interest without blocking the view.

View from the street

View from the street

After

Another perspective...

Evening elegance

Evening elegance

Night lighting in front

The homeowners were so pleased with their new landscaping, they wanted to be able to see it when they came home after dark, since they work long hours. The landscape lighting adds elegance, but also a measure of safety. Lighting was also installed in the back yard around the patio area and trees.

Concord terrace garden

Front wall

Front wall

Road frontage

This wall was 70 years or so old and was falling down all on its own. Made of a single thickness of brick with some rebar at the corners, the weight of the soil behind it was pushing it over.

Front wall

Front wall

Foundation

The brick wall was removed and a foundation for the front wall dug to provide a stable base.

Front wall

Front wall

Terraced walls

Two walls were built with gravel and drainage pipe to carry away excess water. Conduit was also run out to the wall so that lighting and irrigation could be installed at a later date.

Front wall

Front wall

Terraced garden

When the walls were completed, soil amendments were added and the areas tilled.

Front wall garden

Front wall garden

Garden plantings

For ease of care, the area was planted with ornamental grasses, junipers, and creeping phlox.

Washington, DC

Front corner specimen

Front corner specimen

Front garden

When my paternal grandfather died, my mother's siblings gave my parents a Japanese maple in his memory. I incorporated the tree into the garden design and it has been a beautiful and enduring reminder of my grandfather's presence.

Garden for retirement

Garden for retirement

Front garden

When my parents retired, my gift to them was a design and installation of a garden across the front of their home. The low stone wall gives a neat edge at the front of a largely perennial garden. Ornamental grasses provide the illusion of a hedge without blocking the view of the house itself. Low maintenance and low water needs complete the ease of care.

Front sidewalk

This sidewalk was installed in 1926 when the house was built and over time, the flagstone pieces have settled in a very uneven manner, making for a walkway that could be dangerous, especially in wet or icy weather.

Linda Lake

A front shade garden and water guide

A front shade garden and water guide

Front garden

This house is located at the bottom of a slope and water from the slope and the road at the top ran hard and fast towards the house, washing away grass and anything else in its path. By installing a catch basin, a French drain, and a stacked stone wall, the water has been slowed and diverted, and a usable garden planted to greet visitors.

Kannapolis Hospice

Secret prayer garden

Secret prayer garden

fountain

We helped with an Eagle Scout project to create a peaceful and secluded prayer garden on the grounds of the Kannapolis Hospice Center.

Grass to Gravel

South facing hillside

South facing hillside

Before

The homeowners were unable to maintain any semblance of attractive lawn on the hill in the front of the house. They decided to make a bold change and remove all the grass, choosing to replace it with boulders, stone, and pea gravel for a Southwestern xeriscape look.

South facing hillside

South facing hillside

Before

Prior to installing the new landscaping, the hillside needed to be stripped of the existing grass and weeds. It was cleaned and edged with metal edging to help maintain a clean border

Strip along driveway

Strip along driveway

We created oases of plants within the stretches of stone and pea gravel. Several large boulders were placed as well, and a variety of sizes and colors of stone were utilized.

South facing hillside

South facing hillside

After

Boulders, creek stone, pea gravel, and plants combined to create a Southwestern feel, a water saving landscape, and an unsusual feature in an otherwise "uniform" neighborhood.

Southfacing Hillside

Southfacing Hillside

After

An important part of the design was including features that would prevent water from rushing down the hill and carrying the stone along with it. A dry creek bed was installed, along with strategically placed boulders and plants, to slow the downhill velocity of the water going down hill.

New Build Improvements

Side yard

Side yard

Before

The builder provided sod to a certain point, but behind the edge of the sod, the height difference between the soil and the grass created a water backup area that was rarely dry, even after several days. The homeowner also wanted color and interest along the side of the house.

Side of the house

Side of the house

Before

Another perspective of proposed work area.

Side of house

Side of house

After, sodded and new beds added

We cleaned and prepped the area behind the sod, added more soil in both the grass and the new planting bed areas, then installed two pallets of fescue sod and all the plants in the beds. There is room for more planting later, as some of the bushes in the front of the house will eventually be moved there.

Retaining wall

At the end of the front bed, the land drops off sharply and the homeowner was losing a large amount of dirt that was washing down the hill. We installed a two foot retaining wall designed with both beauty and practicality in mind.

Sedgefield spruce-up

Front garden beds

Front garden beds

Before

We were originally called to provide weeding and cleanup for the property. As we walked around, though, it became clear that more was needed and desired. The homeowner built this raised bed using block and placed on the end of the concrete driveway. It was disorganized and needed a bit of variety.

Front garden, left of the front door

Front garden, left of the front door

Before

The homeowner had planted this bed without much thought to organization in the long run, and when thing got too big, she just cut them down and let them grow back.

Front garden bed right of front door

Front garden bed right of front door

Before

Again, the plant choices were not bad, but the bed looked messy and disorganized due to the lack of planning and design.

Front garden beds, left of front door

Front garden beds, left of front door

After

We removed most of the plantings. The beds were cleaned, tilled and amended, and the plants were re-installed with more planning. The border walls were rebuilt, and the beds were cleaned and mulched.

Front garden bed, right of front door

Front garden bed, right of front door

After

Again, the plants were removed, the beds cleaned and "reconditioned", then the plants were replaced in an organized fashion. Both beds had some new plants included, with the remaining specimens being replanted elsewhere on the property.

Tega Cay Terracing

Steep foundation bank

Steep foundation bank

Before

In the back of this lakeside house in Tega Cay, this steep bank had simply been covered with weed fabric and left to its own devices. It was beginning to erode, and was an eyesore from the viewpoint of the dock and paths.

Steep foundation bank

Steep foundation bank

Before

It was decided that terraced beds would be installed encompassing the area from the corner of the house to the edge of the deck, and planted with low maintenance plants and mulched.

Steep foundation bank

Steep foundation bank

After

Using 6x6 timbers, the bank was dug and reshaped to provide beds that were attractive and easy to maintain. They were positioned to take advantage of the slope and built in several levels.

Steep foundation bank

Steep foundation bank

After

Another perspective view

Steep foundation bank

Steep foundation bank

After

View from the deck.

Front landscape overhaul

Before picture

Before picture

An overgrown mish-mash of bushes, planted with little planning and uncared for, presents a messy and confusing picture.

Before

Before

Before

Before

Steep end

Soil washed out at the end of the bed, making it difficult to successfully plant anything at the corner of the house.

After picture

After picture

All of the bushes were removed and the ones in good shape were replanted in a more organized fashion. New bushes and plants were added and the entire area was mulched.

After picture, different perspective

After picture, different perspective

A retaining wall was built to facilitate better planting and drainage

After

After

New shrub put in to flank the far side of the garage.

A back yard transformed

Before

Before

Before

Before

Before

Before

Before

Before